How to Turn Your Clutter into Cash

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1.23.2020
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Lifestyle
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Ameris Bank

Saying goodbye is not easy. We hold onto items such as clothes, outdated electronics, and miscellaneous things that eventually end up collecting dust. If you take the time to clean your home, you might just find that you can sell your items for money.

Here are ways to turn your clutter into cash:

Social Media Groups

Facebook now has “Buy, Sell, Trade” groups based on your location that you can join to sell your gently used items such as clothes, furniture, electronics, and anything else you think someone may want at a discounted price. You can also start your own group if you want to show your items to your friends only.

Garage Sale

Having a garage sale is an easy way to deep clean your house. Pick those items that you don’t use much – the extra bowls in the kitchen, the desk in your storage closet, the old toys that your kids have outgrown – and mark them at a reasonable price. This is a great way to get rid of many items in one day.

Online Clothing Sites

If you have trendy branded men’s, women’s and children’s clothing, you can sell them on www.poshmark.com and other related sites. Or, create a public Instagram account for your closet and post pictures of your clothes and include the price. People can then bid on them and you can remove the picture when the item has sold.

Specific Item Sites

The site www.Cash4Books.net buys old books, pays for shipping and deposits the money you make into your PayPal account. Sites such as www.uSell.com buy used and damaged cell phones, game consoles and tablets, and www.Gazelle.com buys gadgets like mobile phones, laptops and desktops. If you have vintage items, heirlooms gathering dust or a unique garage sale find that you think might be a treasure, look it up on www.WhatSellsBest.com to find a ballpark value.

 

Tackle your spring cleaning early and turn that clutter into cash! You’ll be thankful you did.

 

The opinions voiced in this material are for general information only and are not intended to provide specific advice or recommendations for any individual.

Ameris Bank is not affiliated with nor endorses any of the companies featured in this article.